“The issue is not absolute optimism, but optimism through action.”

Wael Ghonim, whose activism helped fan the flame of the Egyptian revolution, makes the case for optimism:

I believe that anyone participating in effecting change cannot be a pessimist. This is why, when it comes to Egypt’s future, I am an optimist. Revolution is a process; its failure and success cannot be measured after only a few months, or even years. We must continue to believe. […]

I am optimistic because a courageous Egyptian faced an armored vehicle and forced it to stop. I am optimistic because a group of lawyers demanded the right of Egyptians living abroad to vote in national elections. I am optimistic because children as young as 10 have taken part in the demonstrations against the military, chanting, “the people want to bring down the regime.” I am optimistic because 18 million people turned out in March to vote in a referendum on constitutional changes.

The issue is not absolute optimism, but optimism through action.

And some words that might be food for thought for the Occupy protesters as well, as that movement considers its next steps:

Beyond a demonstration or a sit-in or a march, our revolution will succeed only if we transform anger and fear into real actions intended to solve real, specific problems.

(Photo by Amr Nabil, via The Globe and Mail)

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